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THE TATTLER 

Williamsburg High School 



Editor-in-Chief, Sheila Swenson '36 

Assistant Editors, Marguerite Sabo '36, Robert Bisbee '37 

Business Manager, Howard Willson '36 

Assistant Managers, John Walshe '36, Henry Howe '36 



Alice Dresser '36 
Pauline Packard '36 
Francis Packard '36 
William Howe '37 
Ruth Sylvester '36 



Associate Editors 

Marguerite Sabo '36 
Annetta Barrus '37 
Robert Bisbee '37 
Joseph Soltys '38 
Wendell Pittsinger '37 
George Warner '39 



Ruth Black '38 
Esther Clark '36 
Florence Lloyd '36 
Adeline Merritt '37 
Frances Metz '39 



1936 Class Motto 



DO MORE - WISH LESS 



CONTENTS 



Dedication 

Senior Class 

Class Night . 

Graduation Night 

Address of Welcome 

Class History 

Class Prophecy 

Prophecy on Prophetess 

Class Will . 

Grinds 

Class of 1937 

Class of 1938 

Class of 1939 

Editorials 

Literary 

Pro Merito . 

Forensic Group 

Boys' Basketball 

Baseball 

Girls' Basketball 

Jokes and Song Hits 

Favorite Sayings 

We Should Like to See 

Girls' Glee Club 

Boston Trip . 

Alumni Notes 

Autographs . 



4 
5 
8 
8 
9 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
30 
30 
31 
31 
32 




This issue of The Tattler we dedicate to 
G. VERNON WARNER 

VERNIE OUR FRIEND 



The Senior Class 




BERNICE ELIZABETH BICKFORD 



'Bernie" 



Dramatics 4. Archery 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Basketball 
1, 2. Tournament Publicity Committee 4. Costume Com- 
mittee for play 4. 

Bright and cheerful. 
Enjoys lots of fun. 
Bosses "Forrest". 




ESTHER ROSALIND CLARK 



'Es" 



Debating 4. Glee Club 4. Dramatics 2, 4. Entrant State 
and New England Debating Tourneys 4. Secretary Glee 
Club 4. Concert 4. Tattler Exchange Editor 4. Class 
Grinds 4. Archery 4. Committee on Choice of Plays 4. 

Excellent debater. 
Rare punster. 
Characteristically superstitious. 




ALICE LUCILE DRESSER 



'Al" 



Pro Merito. Class Prophecy. Alumni Editor of Tattler 
4. Winner of Temperance Essay 4. Chairman of rooms for 
Tourney 4. Dramatics 1, 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Archery 4. 

Always questioning. 
Likes attention. 
Dances well. 




VARDIC EDWARD GOLASH "Garage" Vice-President 

Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. Co-Captain 4. 
C/ass Secretary 2. Dramatics 4. 

Very shy. 
Enjoys dancing. 
Great tease. 



THE TATTLER 




WALTER FRANCIS GOLASH "Bolick" 

Class Vice-President 3. Assistant Business Manager 
Tattler 3. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. Co-Captain Baseball 4. 
Dramatics 2, 4. 

Will argue. 
Florist. 
Good fellow. 



HENRY FREDERICK HOWE "Sonny" 

Debating Executive Committee 3, 4. Debating 3. Base- 
oall 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. CZass Secretary 1, 3. Pres- 
ufenf 2. Assistant Business Manager Tattler 4. Basket- 
hall Manager 3. 

Hates to study. 

Frankly our sophisticate. 

Has headaches 



FLORENCE CHARLOTTE LLOYD "Fonnie" 

Dramatics 1, 2, 4. P/a?/ Program Committee 3. Entrant 
Prize-Speaking Contest 1, 2. Debating 3. G7ee Chtft 1, 2, 
3, 4. GZ«e C7?<6 President 4. Concert 4. Entrant District 
State and New England Speech Totirneys 4. Archery 4. 
Debating Executive Committee 4. Reporter for Tattler 4. 
Ptoi/ Casting Committee 4. Entrant in Quill and Scroll 
Contest 3. 

Fine actress and singer. 
Confidential adviser to the lovelorn. 
Loveable nature. 



PAULINE ELIZABETH PACKARD "Juddie" 

Pro Merito. Class Will. Assistant Reporter for Tattler 
4. Chairman Decorations for Tourney 4. Debating 3. 
<;h i Club '■'>. Archery 4. 

Plenty of pep. 
Enchanting smile. 
Popular. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 







FRANCIS WAKEFIELD PACKARD "Yutch" President 

Class Treasurer 2, 3. Pro Merito. Prophecy on Prophet. 
Sports Editor 3, 4. Basketball 2, 3, 4. Baseball 2, 3, 4. 
Basketball Captain 3, 4. Co-Captain Baseball 4. Chorus 4. 
Dramatics 4. Entrant State and New England Tourneys 4. 

Full of fun. 

Wonderful dramatic ability. 

Plucky athlete. 



MARGUERITE RUTH SABO 



'Marge" 



Pro Merito. Class President 3. Tattler Associate Editor 
3. Tattler Assistant Editor 4. Graduation Oration. Dra- 
matics 4. Glee Club 2, 3. Program Committee on Tourna- 
ment 4. Casting Committee on Plays 4. 

Merry laugh. 
Rates praise. 
Seldom alone. 



SHEILA BRYANT SWENSON "Bimmy" 

Pro Merito. Glee Club 3, 4. Concert 4. Entrant in State 
and New England Tourneys 4. Dramatics 4. Temperance 
Essay, Second Prize 4. Tattler Literary Editor 3. Tattler 
Editor 4. Gradtiation Essay 4. Archery 4. Committee on 
Choice of Plays 4. Entrant Quill and Scroll Contest 3. 

Scholastically high. 
Baffled physicist. 
Sweet disposition. 



RUTH DAMON SYLVESTER 



'Ruthie" 



Secretary 



Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. Captain Basketball 4. Manager 
Basketball 3. Dramatics 1, 4. Archery 4. Sports Editor of 
Tattler 4. GJee C7w& 1, 2, 3. 

Rarely without deep, effective waves. 
Dandy sport. 
Smiles often. 



- 



THE TATTLER 




JOHN EDWARD WALSHE "Johnny" 



Treasurer 



Basketball 3. Baseball 3. Dramatics 4. Assistant Bus- 
ts Manager Tattler 4. 

Jolly fellow. 

Eager geometrician. 

Witty remarks. 



HOWARD CLIFTON WILLSON 



'Hack" 



President 1. Baseball Manager 3. Basketball Manager 
4. Treasurer of A. A. 4. Business Manager Tattler 4. 
Property Manager Play 4. Dramatics 1. Entrant District 
State and New England SjjucIi Tourneys 4. Debating 4. 
Committee on the choice of plays. 

Happy-go-lucky. 
Clever remarks. 
Wonderful photographer. 



Address of Welcome 
Class History 

Prophecy 
Prophecy on Prophetess 
Class Will 
Class Grinds 



Class Night 



Francis Packard 

Henry Howe 

Alice Dresser 

Francis Packard 

Pauline Packard 

Esther Clark 



Graduation Night 



lion — Life Begins Right Now 
Oration — Challenge to Youth 



Marguerite Sabo 
Sheila Swenson 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Address of Welcome 



Parents, Teachers and Friends: 

The Class of 1936 takes great pleasure 
in welcoming you here tonight to its class 
night exercises. 

As we look back upon the years we have 
spent here with an air of satisfaction, 
we realize that your help and interest in 
our undertakings and our good times have 



made them pleasant ones to remember. We 
are glad to have this opportunity to thank 
you for your many favors and kindnesses 
and to let you know that your spirit has 
been an inspiration to us and something 
which we will never forget. 

We hope that our program tonight will 
be a pleasure to you. 

— Francis Packard '36 



Class History 



Once upon a time in the year 1932 B. G. 
(before graduation) there lived in a big red 
castle in the hamlet of Williamsburg-on-the- 
Mill-River one giant and three giantesses. 
Now these great monsters were much feared 
by the humble villagers because each year 
they demanded a tribute which consisted of 
the flower of the youth of the village. 

In the year 1932 therefore the villagers 
escorted fourteen beautiful maidens and 
twelve handsome young men to the castle 
and there with much weeping and lament- 
ing left them. With fear and trembling the 
maidens and youths entered the castle. 
Here they were pounced upon by the four 
grim owners of the castle and instead of 
being torn limb from limb as they expect- 
ed, and probably deserved, they were direct- 
ed to gloomy looking rooms which contained 
large numbers of desks. Here they were 
given books and warned very solemnly to 
be good or else. . . The poor deluded victims 
promised and at the time really meant to be 
good. To us, that first year was a mild ex- 
ample of what General Sherman said war 
was. Our first torture was called the 
"Freshman Reception". After being hor- 
ribly beaten by our superiors, we were 
forced to perform in front of the entire 
membership of the castle. I am still try- 
ing to figure out which hurt most, the belt 
line or the trick of trying to sew a button 
on a piece of cloth. The next event of our 
first year was the musical comedy "Spanish 
Moon." All of the John and Ethel Barry- 
mores in the Freshman class were released 
by Warner Bros, and they were allowed 
to star in this mammoth production. As 
we hadn't as yet learned the trick of a 



minimum of study and a maximum of fun, 
our social life was very limited. 

The second year, however, conditions 
changed and we began to pay back the 
lordly rulers for our sufferings of the first 
year. That year also we were given more 
freedom and were allowed to try for the 
basketball team. All of us fellows made 
the team and even though we didn't win 
many games, we had lots of fun. 

Our third year some of us debated, some 
played basketball, while others contented 
themselves merely with becoming Pro- 
Meritos. That year we gave the Seniors a 
dance which we were clever enough to put 
on a paying basis much to the disgust of 
those worthies, as the year before they had 
made the colossal sum of five cents on the 
same type of dance. The newspaper ac- 
count the next morning said "the hall was 
beautifully decorated with balloons and 
crepe paper. There was a larger number 
of people present than usual. Refresh- 
ments were served at intermission and a 
good time was enjoyed by all." Everyone 
your reporter asked stated that it was the 
most enjoyable dance they had attended. 

In the fourth and last year we had a 
roll call and found that twelve of our 
number had mysteriously disappeared. We 
discovered later that all the boys had been 
bought by the Red Sox and the girls were 
under contract to make movies, playing op- 
posite such stars as Clark Gable, Franchot 
Tone, and Gary Cooper. However the re- 
maining fourteen have managed to survive 
this last year by keeping close watch of 
every movement our grim warders have 
made and always trying to be good. We 



10 



THE TATTLER 



have even managed to do a lot of things 
which were never done before by other 
classes. Two of these outstanding achieve- 
ments were participating in the M. S. C. 
basketball tournament and in the National 
Speech Tournament. We also escaped from 
the castle for three days during which wt 
went to Boston and made a lasting impres- 



sion on the city. 

So here we are after four years of toil 
and suffering, about to leave this frowning 
castle, which really is quite a grand place, 
and the giant and giantesses who really are 
great people even if they are somewhat 
severe with us at times. 

— Henry Howe '36 



Class Prophecy 



It was an extremely hot day in 1956, and 
as I had been waiting for my friend for 
almost an hour, I grew restless. At last I 
said impatiently to my guide, "Do take 
me to some interesting place where I can 
be amused for a few minutes." 

He eagerly replied, "You must visit a 
great woman here in India. She is very 
mysterious but the natives call her "Magda, 
the Great". No one knows much about her 
except that she has a wonderful invention 
which cannot be surpassed anywhere in the 
world." 

Very much intrigued by this brief ex- 
planation, I determined to visit this strange 
being. "Take me to this marvelous wom- 
an !" I demanded. 

"If I take you," he replied, "you must 
never tell anyone in America. This secret 
must be confined to India. A horrible curse 
will follow anyone who carries word of 
Magda's invention beyond our shores." 

I5y a roundabout route we reached a 
small building into which he quickly hustled 
me. As I entered the building the first 
thing I heard was the exclamation "I love 
it!" My excitement grew as I racked my 
brain to discover where before I had heard 
those words uttered in that tone. Sudden- 
ly I remembered my high school days, and 
as Magda came forward and greeted me, I 
recognized Sheila Swenson. She remem- 
bered me so we sat down to talk. 

"Is it true that you have an extraordin- 
ary invention?" I asked. 

She nodded and smiled. "I must show it 
to you," she -aid as she led me to a large 
table on which was a peculiar instrument. 
"Stand in front of this small microphone 
and think of someone you would like to see; 
then look at this screen." 

I was very skeptical but I did as she 



directed. A slight humming noise and then 

The scene was a football game between 
Yale and Harvard. I could hear the bands 
playing, the spectators applauding. What a 
huge crowd ! Yale was putting up a brave 
fight but the Harvard team was obviously 
superior in every way. Then I heard one 
of the spectators say, "That Harvard team 
is great." 

"It should be; it has a great coach," re- 
plied his companion. "His name is Francis 
Packard. He was graduated from the same 
high school that I attended — Williamsburg 
High — in 1936 and today he is one of the 
best coaches in the United States. Then he 
chuckled as he said, 'A long time ago, when 
he was a senior, he became very fond of 
one of the sophomore girls on the basket- 
ball team, and in spite of heavy competi- 
tion he married her when she finished high 
school.' 

"And in high school days we thought he 
would be a builder of swinging bridges," I 
murmured. 

Eagerly I begged Sheila to turn on the 
switch again. This time the scene was a 
Hollywood premier and the name "The Sec- 
ond Clark Gable." What attracted me was 
the great crowd of beautiful girls around 
the entrance. They were talking excitedly 
about the "Second Gable's" good looks and 
amazing personality. I was interested in 
seeing this startling man. The crowd 
seemed to be making way for him, and sud- 
denly I saw a slim, good-looking curly- 
haired man in evening clothes, carrying a 
cane. As he passed the girls threw flowers 
to him, and he remarked gaily with a gen- 
erous smile, "Hello, you lucky people, here 
1 come." 

Surely it couldn't be the boy of whom 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



11 



I was thinking — but it was — Vardic Go- 
lash ! Will wonders never cease ! 

Then I saw a little cottage right beside 
an airport. The girl at the window anxious- 
ly scanning the sky, seemed familiar. 

"For goodness sake, Bernice," came a 
voice from another room, "hurry up and 
get my supper." 

"Charles, you know I can't do anything 
until Ruthie's plane gets in," she replied. 

So — it was Bernice Bickford and she, 
too, was married. I was most interested 
to note that she was now with Ruth Syl- 
vester, just as she had been in high school. 

Outside a beautiful building in the next 
scene, I noticed a sign on which was writ- 
ten, "Win a beauty contest. See the man- 
ager in his office in this building." Inside 
there were many beautiful girls surround- 
ing a tall man with a Van Dyke beard. In 
spite of this disguise I recognized my class 
mate John Walshe. He seemed very in- 
terested in his work. Choosing the most 
beautiful girl must have been pleasant for 
him since he had always been very interest- 
ed in the opposite sex. I decided that he 
had chosen his life work to suit his weak- 
ness. 

"This is fun," I exclaimed as I thought of 
another name. The scene changed. I could 
see hundreds of cattle in the green meadows 
surrounding a huge dairy farm. I saw a 
motherly-looking woman in a big white 
apron, busily making butter. I heard her 
shout to her husband, "Joe, come here and 
help me with this butter." 

I could scarcely believe it, but it was 
Esther Clark, singing softly as she finished 
the butter and started washing milk bottles. 

Next a whir of an airplane. I watched 
it approach swiftly and then disappear. I 
was very puzzled since I had given up 
thinking of individuals and had just thought 
of the senior class as a whole. 

Seeing that I didn't know who it was, 
Sheila spoke. "Do you mean to tell me you 
don't recognize Ruth Sylvester? She writes 
to me so I know all about her. She flies 



a mail route in Ireland over very treacher- 
ous mountains. Although she was timid in 
high school, Ruth is now a very brave pilot. 
She must have become interested because 
of one of her friends who was a pilot." 

As time was pressing, Sheila told me that 
she would try to tell me what the rest of 
our classmates were doing as she had used 
the machine to obtain this information be- 
fore my visit. 

"Marguerite Sabo is a very famous evan- 
gelist," she said, "and she spends all her 
time converting people." 

"Henry Howe is the manager of a large 
circus. As you know, he was always noted 
for creating fun in high school. The act 
in his circus which draws the biggest 
crowds is the one in which the fat man 
performs. You can never guess who this 
enormous person is — Howard Willson. He 
must have been practising in high school 
when he helped the girls to eat their 
lunches." 

"Walter Golash is a great diplomat who 
is called upon frequently to settle the quar- 
rels of great nations. He developed that 
ability after he left Burgy High." 

"Florence Lloyd has changed greatly since 
she was graduated from high school. She 
is a very precise lady, conducting a very 
select girls school for the study of Latin. 
Can you believe it? She wages a war 
against lipstick, nail polish, and all the 
things she used to use." 

"And — Pauline — I don't know what she 
is doing," she finished. 

"I do," I replied, "because we see each 
other often. She is teaching archery in 
Smith College. She must have become in- 
terested because of the archery classes at 
high school in which she got much private 
instruction." 

"Your invention is wonderful," I said, 
as I bade her good-bye. 

"I certainly have learned a number of 
things since I went into that building," I 
mused, as I went to meet my friend. 

— Alice Dresser '36 



Prophecy of the Prophetess 



On a beautiful April day in 1945 I 
boarded a west bound aeroplane at Roose- 
velt Field, Long Island. I had just accept- 
ed a position as assistant coach of baseball 



at Northwestern University and was start- 
ing my journey there now. 

The plane soon took off and during the 
trip my thoughts kept going back to my 



12 



THE TATTLER 



school days at Burgy High. It had been 
a long time since 1 had seen any of my 
classmates and 1 wondered when I again 
would meet one. 

The trip did not take long and in a few 
hours we landed at Evanston, Illinois. I 
was met there by the Director of Athletics 
at Northwestern who took me to his car. 
Within a few minutes we arrived at the 
college, and after he had showed me to my 
room we started toward the ball diamond. 
The team was already practicing. 

On the way we passed a field where many 
girls were practicing archery. As I 
watched them, I took especial notice of the 
young lady who was coaching them. I knew 
I had seen her somewhere but could not 
place her. My curiosity grew and finally 
I turned to the director and asked, "What 
is the name of that woman coaching those 
girls in archery over there?" 

"Why," he replied, "that's Mrs. Wilde. 
She's been here for tw ? o years." 

"Mrs. Wilde?" I mused. Then a thought 
struck me. "Didn't her name used to be 
Dresser?" I asked. 

"I think it was," the director said, "but 
how did you know'."' 

"She's an old classmate of mine," I 
shouted as I ran toward where she was 
standing. 

"Hello, Alice," I greeted as I came up to 
her. 

"Why, Francis," she said, astounded. 
"What are you doing here?" 

I told her of the position I had obtained 



at the University and then shouted to the 
Director of Athletics that I would be at the 
ball field in a few minutes. 

"Practice will be over in just a minute," 
Alice said, and so a few minutes later we 
sat on a bench under a beautiful oak tree 
while we talked over our experiences. 

"How does it happen that you're here?" 
I asked her. "I thought you were headed 
for housekeeping." 

"Well," she replied. "It's a long story. 
In the last term of high school at Burgy I 
became so interested in archery under the 
tutorship of Coach "Cabby" Thayer, that I 
thought I would like to continue in that 
line. I went to Sargent Physical Educa- 
tion School in Boston and there took up 
all kinds of girls' athletics, including arch- 
ery. After graduation I obtained a posi- 
tion at Wellesley, but two years later I 
married Ralph Wilde. He was then Gen- 
eral Manager of the fast growing Potter's 
Grain Co. and his office was located here 
in Evanston. When I moved here I tried for 
and obtained a position at Northwestern 
and have been here since." 

Then I told her my story and as it was 
getting late I told her that I must go. 

"Why don't you come up to the house 
tonight?" she invited. "We'll talk over old 
times." 

"Thanks," I said, "I will." 

She gave me her address and I left her 
knowing that that evening I would be able 
to live over the experiences of high school 
days. — Francis Packard '36 



Class Will 



We, the Class of 1936 whose amazing 
brilliance has dazzled teachers and pupils 
of Williamsburg High School for the past 
four years, do hereby publish our last will 
and testament on this twenty-third day of 
June, 1936. It is hoped that you who are 
listening fully appreciate the extraordinary 
privilege now being granted you. Few are 
the audiences which have been allowed to 
hear our words of wisdom. 

To the faculty we wish to express our 

gratitude for their never-tiring patience 

with us which I am sure they certainly need- 

ed, and their time which we hope was not 

■ •'I. 



1. To the Class of 1939 we leave our 
quiet ways so that they will be more worthy 
to become sophomores. 

2. Our places in Room I are willed to the 
Class of 1938, and we hope that a few steps 
across the hall will give them the dignity 
necessary for that room. 

3. We leave to the Class of 1937 the pri- 
vilege of going to Boston and staying in 
the rooms we had. Here's hoping they have 
as wonderful a time as we. 

4. Florence Lloyd bestows her singing 
ability to Billy Howe to croon to Marcia 
Hobbs on those bus trips to basketball 
games next winter. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



13 



5. To Barbara Nash, Vardic leaves his 
pranks and that winning smile. We think 
they'll make up for her lack of height. 

6. Esther Clark leaves to anybody who 
is fond of writing notes, her spelling abil- 
ity. We are sure fewer notes would be 
written since reading them would no long- 
er be a pleasure. It would be a long tire- 
some job. 

7. John Walshe wishes to leave his win- 
ning ways to James Stone. Try them on 
some of the girls in your class, James, and 
see how they like them. 

8. To all the boys in the school, the 
Senior girls will a shaving set. We do hope 
that they will make more use of it than 
the Senior boys have this year. 

9. Bernice's giggle is willed to Lena Burt 
so that the teacher will know that Lena is 
in the room. 

10. Walter leaves the right to like all of 
next year's Freshmen as well as he did this 
year to Wendell Pittsinger. 

11. To the most worthy of the Junior 



girls who go to Boston next year, Marguer- 
ite Sabo leaves the right to go and get her 
stockings which were thrown away by mis- 
take and also her curlers which she forgot. 
The room is 208. 

12. Alice Dresser wishes to leave her 
hay fever to Vernon West. Those spells of 
sneezing will help to fill in the gap after 
Miss Walsh calls on him in English. 

13. To Warren Gould, Howard Willson 
leaves his sleepy appearance. Now, I think 
Warren will look fully asleep. 

14. Lastly we will our studiousness and 
diligence to the whole school and we hope 
that they will do it a lot of good. 

In testimony whereof, we hereunto set 
our hand and seal on this document on this 
twenty-third day of June in the year of our 
Lord nineteen hundred thirty-six. 

(signed) The Class of 1936. 

Witnesses: 

Jiggs 

Haile Selassie 

Pop-eye. 



Class Grinds 



Fourteen blackbirds high up in a tree, 
Croaking loud together "Me! Oh Me! 
Have you heard? Did you see? 
If you have come tell me; 
The cause of all the noise 
Is more than I can see." 

"Shame! Shame!" cried a bluebird, 
'"Tis graduation day!" 
"Right!" cried a saucy black, 
"Then list to what I say!" 

"Her hair is black, 

Her eyes are brown, 

Her lips and nails are red; 

Her feet are fleet, 

Her voice is sweet, 

We're sure she'll soon be wed." 

"I know, it's Florence Lloyd." 
The voice was from thirteen. 
"The rime was very good; 
Can mine be near as keen?" 

"She's tall, she's dark, 

She dances well, 

Her laugh we like to hear; 



But talk she must 
And talk she will 
Until her end is near." 

"Very good, very good," 
Cried the twelfth upon the tree 
"That was Alice I am sure 
Now listen please to me." 

"He has a wink, 

A smile so fleet, 

And both he uses often ; 

He's good as gold, 

But can't be led 

He said, 'Thumbs down on Boston'!" 

"Fine! Fine!" cried the next bird, 
So high up in the tree; 
"Surely that was Walter, 
Please listen now to me." 

"'Tis nine o'clock 

And all is well, 

She's just arrived in class; 

And in her hand, 

As every morn, 

A piece of toast she grasps!" 



14 



THE TATTLER 



"Very good, very good," 
Cried the 10th upon the limb, 
"Her name is Sheila — tho' I know 
They sometimes call her film. 

"A big black box, 

A coil and tube, 

Some wee and wiggly wires, 

Some acid strong, 

A leaden plate, 

A battery and some pliers." 

"By the articles he uses, 
And the number that they are, 
We're sure it must be Howard, 
Now wore we wrong, by far?" 

"Oh hear the he he's, — 
In the ha ha's nest, 
My, my, who can they be? 
They giggle and whisper, 
Each school day through, 
And oft stay after three." 

"We know! 'Twas Ruth and Bernice," 
Cried the eighth upon the tree; 
"Now, I will try my best, 
So harken sharp to me." 

"His Irish smile's, 

For many a girl, 

But his heart's for only one; 

He's going to fly, 

An aeroplane, 

When his senior year is done." 

"Ah ha! Ah ha! my dears," 
The seventh jumped up in glee, 
"I know, I know," he cried, 
"That's John! You can't fool me!" 

"She's very sweet, 

She's charming too, 

As all the boys well know; 

She has a blush 

That warms their hearts, 

And makes their faces glow." 

"Ah yes, that was Pauline," 
Six jumped down from the tree. 
He made a bow and asked 
"Who will th<- next one be?" 

r 'He likes to dance, 
He'a handsome too, 
And how he likes the girls; 
I'ut that's not all, 



They like him too, 

And keep him in a whirl!" 

"That I'm sure was Henry," 
Cried the fifth upon the tree. 
Down he hopped and closed one eye, 
And said quite plain to me. 

"She's very cute, 

She's very smart, 

And always knows her stuff; 

She's liked by all, 

I'm very sure 

Her temper's hard to ruff." 

"I know! it's Marguerite, 
Quoth clever number three," 
And down he hopped and said, 
"Now guess my mystery." 

"A good athlete, 

An actor too, 

He's both of these and more; 

His history 

He knows so well, 

He could not be a bore." 

"I know," croaked number two, 
"Your mystery I've solved, 
I thought so hard and found, 
That Francis was involved." 

"His wit I know, 

You can not beat, 

Four years he's made us laugh. 

He files his nails, 

In History class, 

To cause his neighbor's wrath." 

"Oh who would have the wit? 
And who would file his nails? 
I know," quoth number one. 
"'Tis Vardic whom he hails." 

"I'm not a poet; 

I can't write rimes, 

But I am sure you'll guess 

Who wrote these ditties, 

And formed these lines, 

And now I'll join the rest." 

"Fourteen blackbirds high up in a tree, 
Croaking loud together Me! Oh Me! 
We have heard what is the matter, 
We have seen each senior too, 
And now we'll make our bow 
And bid "Farewell to you !" 

—Esther Clark '36 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



15 




Class of 1937 



Annetta Barms 
Ruth Barms 
Robert Bisbee 
Lillian Blanchard 
Barbara Burt 
Phyllis Damon 
Christine Field 
Edward Fontaine 
Richard Graves 
Dorothy Harrison 
William Howe 



Helen Kolosewicz 
Adeline Merritt 
Mary Mickaloski 
Fern Mosher 
Lena Nietsche 
Katherine Ozzolek 
Winifred Packard 
Wendell Pittsinger 
Warren Russell 
Mary Ryan 
Edna Thayer 



Vernon West 



16 



THE TATTLER 




Class of 1938 



Emily Ames 
Richard Ames 
Violet Arnold 
Ruth Black 
Robert Bradley 
Roberta Colburn 
Stella Demerski 
Virginia Edwards 
Douglas Fairbanks 
Adam Gola.-h 
Donald Gould 
Marcia Hobbs 



Dorothy Joyal 
Elizabeth Knight 
.Margaret Linehan 
Marion Martin 
Norma Xietsche 
Stanley Pavelcsyk 
Dorothy Suomi 
James Stone 
Eleanor Swenson 
Helen Taradena 
Betty Tetro 
Thomas Coogan 



Joseph Solty- 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



17 




Class of 1939 



Dorothy Algustoski 
Helen Batura 
Richard Bates 
Jane Bickford 
Shirley Campbell 
Jean Carney 
Edward Cerpovicz 
Barbara Edwards 
Ruth Evans 
Hazel Finkle 
Carlton Field 
Agnes Gagne 
Stacia Golash 
Stephen Golash 
Warren Gould 
Vera Harrison 
Herbert Kellogg 
Rita LaFlamme 
Barbara Lloyd 
Roger Lloyd 
Peggy MacLeod 



Frances Metz 
Donald Mollison 
Francis Molloy 
Barbara Nash 
Donald Otis 
Edith Packard 
Hazel Packard 
Doris Sabo 
Howard Sanderson 
Virginia Shumway 
Frank Soltys 
Robert Sutherland 
Raymond Stone 
Frank Taylor 
Hazel Torrey 
George Warner 
Richard Watling 
Pernice Weeks 
Janice Wells 
Phyllis West 
June Young 



18 



THE TATTLER 



Editorials 



SHOOT HIGH 

In these twentieth century days of speed 
and bustle, youth must shoot at a worth- 
while goal and hit it. In a gun, the bullet 
shot must have the proper speed for a cer- 
tain distance. If this speed cannot be ob- 
tained the force of gravity will pull it down 
and you will shoot under the target. 

There are countless examples of accurate 
shooters in past history — men such as 
Washington and Lincoln are typical ones — 
who shot and hit their mark by tiie aid of 
their decisions between right and wrong. 

It is improbable to think that all of us 
youth can shoot at our marks and hit them 
as these men did. It is safe to say that 
nearly all will shoot beneath the mark — un- 
less we aim high and allow for the force 
of gravity and finally attain our goal. 

—Robert Bisbee '37 



NARROW STREETS 

Most of us are not familiar with slums. 
We avoid the sight and thought of these 
districts where living and sensitive crea- 
tures like ourselves are crowded together, 
comparable to cattle in a pen. If by chance, 
business or duty demands that Mr. White- 
collar descend from his clean, cool office to 
walk, jostled by peddlers and greasy, half- 
clothed children, through narrow streets 
hung with gray attempts at washing, he 
will hurry along, trying not to see the sights 
and smell the smells of this place, a re- 
minder of "man's inhumanity to man". 

For many years now, our country has 
been conscious of the seriousness of the slum 
question. Much labor legislation has been 
enacted by each state providing ror mini- 
mum wages, maximum hours and similar 
conditions favorable to the worker. The 
quota of immigrants accepted each year has 
been reduced again and again until it is now 
comparatively small, and much has been 
done to Americanize and assimilate the 
foreign centers where exist the extreme pov- 
erty and illiteracy of our big cities. 
Throughout the nation, welfare work and 



social service are advancing under the impe- 
tus provided by the many serious-minded 
men and women who have studied all angles 
of the situation and know where to tear 
down and how to rebuild. 

Each one of us knows someone part of 
whose mind could be compared to a narrow 
street, overhung with washing. Alien and 
undesired thoughts live here: dirty vendors, 
voluble women with shawls over their heads 
and chattering children clinging to their 
skirts fill the street. 

Though much can be done in city tene- 
ment districts by welfare workers, the con- 
dition of one's mind depends altogether upon 
the individual. Of course, there are institu- 
tions for the insane, and marvelous work is 
being done in the field of phychiatry, but I 
have not been speaking of insanity. Can we 
not abolish our sloppy, careless habits of 
mind and sweep away all dusty, worthless 
thoughts to make room for the fresh and 
important ones which gather each day. Any 
normal person, if you know him well 
enough, will admit that he has a secret iso- 
lated quarter of his mind, either a grave- 
yard or an alien center, where foreign, un- 
loved ideas sleep and walk and have their 
being; and he will not be very proud of the 
fact. The mind should be a lovely city, 
gleaming in sunlight, with broad, wind- 
swept avenues of reason, sense of humor, 
amusement parks, and with secret high 
places, inviolable and inviolate. A man pos- 
sessing an ideal thought-city like this is 
instinctively recognized as superior by his 
fellow-men. Usually they call such a one a 
man of personality, of magnetic charm, of 
sterling character, some going no further 
into the matter than this, some digging to 
the bottom. In the case of the latter, the 
searcher finds that here is a man of wisdom 
and knowledge, a man of reflection, deep 
and far-reaching. But he will never find a 
man of these qualities without finding also 
an ordered system by which are stored up 
all learning and conclusions. His system 
gives such a man complete self-confidence 
and keeps him from conceit, gives him sym- 
pathy and clear vision, gives him power 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



19 



over ideas and words, gives him the courage 
and faith necessary to lead men. 

We must have tolerance in this world and 
tolerance cannot move in narrow streets. 
We must have understanding and under- 
standing cannot breathe the stale air of 
slums. We must have faith and faith cannot 



live in dirt and dust. Each man is master 
of his own thought-settlement. Let him 
awaken and clean house, deport all unde- 
sirable brain-children, and broaden his 
streets of vision. Let him look to every 
corner of his city, testing foundations for 
truth and heights for beauty. 

— Sheila Swenson '36 



Literary 



EATEN ALIVE . . . 

We hope you will be calm. We are relying 
on your presence of mind and your remem- 
brance of Nathan Hale to help you through 
your last moments. 

We, the gods, have fluttered gently 
through 107 light years of vapid space to 
amuse ourselves by the antics of you 
atoms. As this is our farewell tour, kindly 
oblige us by depositing your chewing gum 
in the basket. Compassionately, we shall 
grant you a few moments to explain your 
preferences in wild animals as devourers of 
men. Whenever we are bored, we shall sig- 
nify in the usual manner by raising the 
right hand, and you mortals will be expected 
to sink through the floor. . . Commence, 
John Brown. 

Er . . . well, I shall begin with the lion 
of Judah. As a devourer, he is guaranteed 
to do the job quickly and crunchingly, for 
he has been living in the ruins of an Ethi- 
opian bombed city and it is a long time 
since he had a nice olive-oily Italian for 
breakfast. "Ah, those Italians," says Leo. 
"They satisfy." There is prestige in suffer- 
ing this ancient Roman torture, in being 
eaten by the king of beasts. An ace-high 
death ! 

Next, the leopard ... he has more sub- 
tlety than the lion. Mr. Leopard would purr 
a little, lick the remains of your uncle off 
his whiskers, purr a little more and walk 
around you. When he finally sat down to 
dinner, it would be with the smirk of Nero 
on his dainty lips and the seduction of Cleo- 
patra in his eyes. It would be a leisurely 
meal and you would have ample time to set 
down your memoirs in the black notebook 
which you always keep in your back pocket, 



if the leopard did not thoughtlessly eat your 
back pocket first. You would be comforted 
by the fact that, since cats have nine lives, 
your friend leopard would not be sent to the 
Happy Hunting Ground with indigestion 
from you. For persons with finesse, there is 
nothing like being eaten by a leopard. 

Now let us discuss the conveniences a 
whale offers an inside guest. In the first and 
most important place, the whale gulps his 
dinners and omits the chewing process. 
(How shocked Ipana would be!) One's dying 
quarters here are very spacious; a man can 
stand erect in a whale, unless the sea is 
choppy. A can-opener is always handy; or 
if the devoured can succeed in tickling Papa 
Whale's tender tummy, a convulsion is like- 
ly to ensue and he will find himself once 
more in the open sea. Then he may drown 
in peace. 

The worst imaginable fate would be dying 
in a Tibetan mandarin's soup. Who can 
enumerate its ingredients and their degrees 
of staleness? And who wants to be second 
course to a rotten egg? 

. . . We, the gods, are bored. Boil this 
man-morsel in Tibetan soup. 

John Brown: . . . Moriturus, saluto. 

— Sheila Swenson '36 



THE MODERN ROBINSON CRUSOE 

I was born in the year of 1900 A.D. Three 
days after my birth, my father, my mother, 
and all the neighbors solemnly agreed that 
there was no other child like me. 

When I was one week old, my father 
came into my room, looked at me, groaned, 
and left the house. I have never seen him 
since. 



20 



THE TATTLER 



My mother managed to put me through 
high school. She was a very large woman, 
so, when she told the principal (who was a 
nervous little person) that it would make 
her very happy if her son graduated and 
very unhappy if he didn't, the principal im- 
mediately made out my diploma. 

I entered the War, was captured by the 
Germans, and a week later was paid five 
hundred dollars by the commandant to 
escape. On the return voyage to the United 
States the captain of the ship called me 
up to the bridge, and asked me to lean over 
the rail to see if I could guess the number 
of feet from the rail to the water. While 
leaning over, something struck me forcibly 
from behind tumbling me into the water. 
The ship continued on its way at redoubled 
speed. 

After a week of terrible hardships, land 
hove in sight. Here I built a cabin and pro- 
ceeded to become acquainted with my sur- 
roundings. During my wanderings my nose 
led me to a peculiar kind of fish. I took it 
home and cooked a bit of it. Upon eating 
it, I was surprised at its intriguing flavor. 
Seeing the possibilities of this species of 
fish, I enlarged my cabin, built tables, and, 
after two years of experiment, installed 
electricity. I then built a mammoth sign, 
which read, "Robbie's Fish Fry", illuminat- 
ing it with electricity. I am still waiting 
for my first customer. 

— Henry Howe '36 



PUZZLED 



I wonder why the smoke 
Rises high, 

Like softest swansdown feathers 
'Gainst the sky. 

I wonder why the trees 
Gently sway, 

Like slender, supple marsh-reeds 
Late in May. 

I wonder why — 
I wonder why. 



— Eleanor Swenson '38 



AVIATORS* WARNING 

I know a brave lad in our town 

Who, flying, gained great renown. 

To spin, loop, and stall, frightened him not 

at all 
And he said to himself, "This beats playing 

ball". 

He soared over all the wide nation, 

He was in the air a sensation. 

He skimmed o'er the trees with the greatest 

of ease, 
Very few were the girls that he failed to 

please. 

But one day while doing a spin, 

The hearts of the ladies to win, 

He ran out of gas, then came a great crash, 

Lilacs, lilies and roses they sent him. 

—John Walshe '36 



IF I COULD CHANGE MY NAME . . . 

Here are five, thin, insignificant words, 
making up a small phrase. Yet this small 
phrase is not insignificant for to the most 
casual of the human herd the thought 
carries a certain intrigue and to the keen 
analyst the expression of such a desire is 
a key to the secret corridors of the brain. 
There ai - e, of course, many different in- 
stances of this wishful utterance and in the 
serious interpretation of mental flexes and 
reflexes the tone of the speaker of this 
phrase is definitely of importance. He 
would be a foolish psychologist who both- 
ered to formulate elaborate explanations in 
cases where the motives of the speakers 
were obvious or their words spoken in a 
playful vein. 

We all know why Isaac Goldberg, a prom- 
ising young doctor, changes his name to 
John Wheeler. There is much prejudice 
again the Jewish, though the individual 
be of fine intellect and brilliant 
genius. We are all familiar with the situa- 
tion of Violet Sweetflowerlet, who wants to 
be a reporter and changes her name to Jane 
Stearns. There is the case of Anna 
Schwartz whose greatest ambition is to be- 
come a movie actress. To further her de- 
sire, she becomes Gloria Glistentop and is 
well on the way to a throne among the im- 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



21 



mortal. No one can deny the fact that the 
few words on his calling card must have a 
distinct, if superficial, effect on everyone to 
whom the card is presented. Ana who could 
blame Mr. Milquetoast's son, who is not a 
chip off the old block, for changing his last 
name to Hardguy? It is needless to mention 
the fact that every normal woman hopes to 
change her name; boys have been cheated 
by custom in this denial to the right to nomi- 
nal variety! Everyone is habitually forming 
mental pictures of other unseen men from 
the several words to which they are destined 
to be harnessed for eternity. 

Some of us undoubtedly remember the 
actual case tried in Boston a few years ago, 
concerning the unparalleled determination 
of a certain Polish gentleman to change his 
name to Cabot. The Cabots of Boston took 
the case to court and put up an obstinate 
struggle, but they fought a losing battle. 
For though the judge (who might nave been 
a Cabot!) alternately begged and demanded 
that the Polish gentleman alter his appli- 
cation in favor of some other beautiful 
American name, the foreigner stood firm 
and the Cabots were not upheld by the law 
of the land. Some distinguished American 
has written a poem, running something like 
this: 

I hail from the city of Boston, 
The home of the bean and the cod, 
Where the Lowells talk only to Cabots, 
And the Cabots talk only to God. 
This illustrates how thousands of families 
hold their name sacred, something to be 
cherished and kept shining from one gen- 
eration to another. Often in England a 
father will leave his fortune to his only 
daughter on the condition that she preserve 
the family name upon marriage by a hyphe- 
nated title, such as the case of Miss Smith, 
who becomes Mrs. Smith-Jones. 

There are many peculiar names in the 
world and often one would not blame a Mr. 
Tiger or a Mr. Pond for changing his name 
to something more logical. In the gallery 
of the Chamber of Commerce of the State 
of New York, there is an oil painting of 
a distinguished gentleman, frock-coated and 
goateed, and beneath a gold plaque bearing 
his name: The Hon. Mr. Preserved Fish. 
Authors are continually running up 
against knives at their throats and revolvers 



in their ribs, for having chosen a singu- 
larly impossible and improbable title for the 
villain; they have besmirched the name of 
some respectable citizen whom they did not 
dream could exist. 

These are but a few of the cases and 
motives involved in changing one's name. 
What's in a name, anyway? 

— Anonymous 



THE RED SOX 

Now, everyone knows Jimmy Foxx, 
Who hits the ball both far and wide, 
To win the games for our Red Sox; 
He's poison to that other side. 

Then, Lefty Grove is next in line; 
A pitcher, he of great reknown; 
There is no other quite so fine, 
With him the Red Sox go to town. 

Melillo stars at second base, 
Altho a little chap is he, 
He'll keep them in the pennant race, 
Until he can no longer see. 

All have heard of Billy Werber, 
To baseball he is just the same 
As the novelist Miss Ferber 
Is to the literature game. 

At shortstop, then, is E. McNair, 
And does he know his P's and Q's, 
He'll beard the tiger in his lair, 
He loves to win but hates to lose. 

The Red Sox catcher is Rick Ferrell, 
And he is thought the ace of all; 
He keeps the Red Sox out of peril 
By daily smackings on the ball. 

Cramer knows each in and out 
Of centerfield, where he is found, 
He is the best without a doubt; 
And how he can that baseball pound ! 

Manush patrols the field in left, 
And really does a fine job too; 
And he is fast and smart and deft; 
He never gets a jeer or boo. 

Last, but not least, is Dusty Cooke, 
For in right field he plays with zest, 
And how we all just stare and look, 
When Dusty Cooke is at his best! 

— Annetta Barrus '37 



22 



THE TATTLER 



TAKING THE CENSUS 

"Good-morning, Madam. Is the head of 
the house at home?" 

"I'll have you know I'm the head of the 
house, and I'm at home if it's any of youi 
business. Who are you to come snooping 
around like this, I'd like to know? 

"I'm the Census man. I've come to take 
the Census." 

"Whose senses do you intend to take? I 
guess you need some yourself as you don't 
seem to have any of your own." 

"I beg your pardon, Ma'am, bur you don't 
understand. I've come to take the facts about 
your household. Now, you're a marvelous, 
good-looking, fine young woman, and if 
you'll tell a few things I'll be very grateful. 
How many people are there living in this 
house?" 

"Well, there's I and my husband is one 
and—" 

"Pardon me, Ma'am, you mean two, don't 
you?' 

"I know what I mean. Stop interrupting 
and listen." 

"Oh, all right." 

"Well, as I said before, I and my hus- 
band is one, and Bowser and Dinah, the 
black girl, is three." 

"Who's Bowser?" 

"He's our dog of course!" 

"Oh, I mean just the two-legged persons." 

"Oh, that's different. Then Bridget makes 
four and — " 

"Who's Bridget?" 

"Who should she be but our best red hen?" 

"Listen, will you give me logically cor- 
rect answers?" 

"There's Si and Joe and Bill and then 
there's Molly and all her young ones." 

"Well, who's Molly, your daughter?" 

"Sakes alive! No, she's our turkey that 
just hatched thirty little turkeys." 

"Old lady! You make me disgusted. I'm 
getting angry. Now, is your husband em- 
ployed?" 

"No, his name isn't Em Ployed. It's just 
plain Hiram Jones." 

"I mean, is your husband working?" 

"Working! Humph! He hasn't done a 
stroke of work for five months, except to 
sit on the back porch and snore." 

"Have you any daughters?" 



"Yes, I've got two, Sarah a..d Samantha." 

"How old are they?" 

"How inquisitive you are, Mr. Thingama- 
bob! Sarah's nigh twenty and Samantha's 
fifteen." 

"What grades are they in?" 

"Well, Samantha's in the sixth anc 
Sarah's in the seventh." 

"Have you an encyclopedia for them?" 

"No, I haven't. They can walk. It won't 
hurt them a bit. I had to walk twice as far 
when I was young." 

"Have you a dictionary?" 
"What's that, a machine for milking cows? 
If it is we haven't got one." 

"Oh, I give up. Well, my good lady, I 
thank you a lot for answering my questions 
so clearly. I knew as much when I came as 
I do now. Good-day, Madam!" 

"Good-day!" 

—Hazel Packard '39 



SPRING 



Winter is gone, 

And spring is here, 
The snow has melted, 

Quite gone for a year. 

II 

The sap is running, 

And robins sing, 
Surely everyone know? 

That this is Spring. 

Ill 

The flowers awake, 
From a long winter sleep, 
The children pick them, 
When first they peep. 

IV 

Soon violets blossom, 

So dainty and fair, 
And many flowers cover 

The ground that was bare. 



Spring! Spring is here, 
Oh, earth be glad! 

In all this joy 

Can anyone be sad? 



— June Young '39 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



23 



EYEBROWS-On the Up and Up 

There are eyebrows and eyebrows. Most 
of us are not eyebrow-conscious; that is, 
with our first glance at a friend's friend who 
is being introduced, we notice his hair, eyes, 
and hands, perhaps, but scarcely ever his 
eyebrows. And here we make a serious 
mistake. For, if clues to someone's per- 
sonality can be gleaned from a hasty im- 
pression of the shape of his ears, surely the 
same clues, if less apparent, must be hidden 
in his brows. This method will eliminate the 
difficulty certain to arise if the person in 
question had very small and intricate ears, 
because everyone will concede that it is 
harder to find and analyze ears than eye- 
brows. 

It is to be admitted that eyebrows vary 
to a greater degree among women than 
among men. Although at first impression 
this seems to mean that personalities are 
more stereotyped in the latter class, I am 
not feminist enough to be able to defend 
such a statement, open to the violent chal- 
lenge certain to result. It has been whisp- 
ered that we girls "do things" to our brows 
by means of greases, oils, pliers, shoe black- 
ing, and kindred materials. No one, how- 
ever, must give any credit to these rumors, 
since they are undoubtedly false, and as for 
the gentlemen, let them cease being curious, 
for we shall defend our secrets to the bit- 
ter end and only over our dead bodies shall 
they ever reach our dressing tables. Also, 
it will be of no avail for them to question, 
because they will find (or perhaps have 
found) that ladies then instantly retire be- 
hind a curtain of dignified pleasantries 
about the weather and the likelihood of a 
storm tomorrow. 

Now to go into the problem of how eye- 
brows dove-tail with personalities. There 
are frightened brows and haunted ones ; 
there are those which illustrate the Eternal 
Question, with their figures of inverted 
"u's"; there are the faint, thin, pencil-like 
arches of the delicate and wistful little wom- 
an. Let us not forget to mention the 
straight, determined lines cutting the fore- 
head of our serious-minded American busi- 
ness-woman, the righteous holier-than-thou 
lift of the brows of a Back Bay dowager, 
the perfect semi-circles of a blues singer, 
guaranteed to emphasize her glowing eyes 



and heavy silvered lids. Then there are the 
famous brows of Marlene Dietrich, almost 
straight and winging up at the ends toward 
the temples, as popular a style among wom- 
en as Clark Gable's moustache among men. 
Surely each of us knows, or has known at 
sometime, a man with thunder-cloud eye- 
brows, from beneath which peer little eyes 
like two puppy dogs under a hedge. And if 
he has a temper, his brows draw together 
into a heavy frown at the slightest provo- 
cation, by which sign all his family, friends, 
and relations are warned of the impending 
storm in time to escape and seek shelter. 

If we have "frozen" eyebrows and lack 
the suitable extreme sophistication, let us 
thaw them out and give these neglected ex- 
pressors of feeling a chance for exercise. 
Noticing those of others and how they be- 
tray the traits of their owners, take heed 
and make your own eyebrows express the 
thoughts and emotions of the person you 
want to be. 

Anonymous. 



BELCHERTOWN vs. BURGY 

On December 6, Burgy High's basketball 
team took the floor against Belchertown, as 
underdogs, in the first game of the season. 
Belchertown has always been a stiff op- 
ponent and this year brought no change. 

The Burgy players went onto the floor and 
played the first half with plenty of fight. 
At the rest period Burgy was trailing 13 to 
10. 

If the first half was close, the second half 
was closer. Burgy and Belchertown were 
both fighting hard and Burgy barely suc- 
ceeded in tying the score at 23 as the whistle 
blew. 

A three-minute overtime was agreed upon 
and after about a minute and a half 
a Burgy player slipped in a basket, making 
the score, Burgy 25, Belchertown 23. Then 
a foul was called on a Burgy player but 
the Belchertown man failed and as the game 
ended a minute later, Burgy ran off the 
floor the victor in her first struggle of the 
season. 

In a preliminary game between the second 
teams of both schools, Burgy succeeded in 
eking out a close victory, with a score of 
17-13. 



24 



THE TATTLER 




Standing — Alice Dresser, Pauline Packard 
Sitting — Sheila Swenson, Francis Packard, Marguerite Sabo 

Pro Merito Society 



President — Marguerite Sabo 
Secretary — Pauline Packard 

This year the Williamsburg High School 
Pro Merito Association attended two meet- 
ings of the Western Masachusetts Pro Meri- 
to Society. 

On Oct. 19th the Phi Beta Kappa Asso- 
ciation very kindly allowed the Pro Merito 
Society to hold its convention at State Col- 
lege. About 210 students and faculty mem- 
bers were present and if they all had as 
good a time as we did, they surely enjoyed 
themselves. 

After the business meeting at which 



Sheila Swenson was elected vice-president, 
we made a tour of inspection through the 
new Thatcher Dormitory. 

At lunch, Dean W. S. Machmer gave a 
message of welcome followed by an interest- 
ing and instructive talk on Dialects, by 
Professor MacKimmie. 

We then made a tour through the new 
Goodell Library, a very beautiful and mod- 
ern building. 

For the remainder of the afternoon we 
watched the interesting soccer game be- 
tween Mass. State and Williams. 
Continued on Page 33 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



25 




Seated (reading left to right) Debaters, Wendell Pittsinger, Annetta Barrus, Mrs. 

Warner (debate coach), Miss Baker (oratory coach), Robert Bisbee, Esther Clark 

Standing (left to right) Florence Lloyd, Phyllis Damon, Francis Packard, Ruth Barrus, 

Vernon West, Sheila Swenson, Howard Willson, Winifred Packard 



Forensic Group 



This year a very great honor and respon- 
sibility came to our school. Our coach was 
chosen by The National Forensic League to 
organize the first statewide speech tourna- 
ment for high school students ever held in 
Massachusetts and as a result of her accept- 
ance — our school became the host for this 
momentous event. Thirteen of our Jun- 
iors and Seniors, chosen after preliminary 
elimination contests pai-ticipated in by 
nearly 75% of these two classes and 25% 
of the whole school, were given careful 
training in oratory by Miss Phyllis Baker of 
the English department and in extempor- 
aneous speaking and debating by Mrs. Ray- 
mond Warner of the History department. 

Finally, on March 27-28, after a week's 
postponement because of the floods, the 
Tournament took place. Contestants from 
the following twelve schools competed: 
Barnstable of Hyannis, Cambridge High 
and Latin, Charlton, Groton, Hadley, 
Hamilton, Harwich on the Cape, Hingham, 
Manchester, Warren, Worcester (North 
High), and Williamsburg. Exactly one hun- 
dred contestants competed in this "pioneer" 



speech tournament which brought so much 
prestige to Williamsburg and W. H. S. In 
spite of this keen competition, Sheila Swen- 
son won second place in the finals with her 
original oration "Challenge to Youth". This 
made her eligible to enter the National 
Speech Tournament in Oklahoma City but 
she felt that she could not do so. Williams- 
burg's negative debate team including An- 
netta Barrus and Wendell Pittsinger, won 
all three debates, including the final; its 
affirmative team, including Esther Clark 
and Robert Bisbee, won both in the preli- 
minaries but lost the fateful final by a 2-1 
decision. The other W. H. S. entrants and 
their speeches were: extemporaneous speak- 
ing, Francis Packard, "Dictators of France 
— the French bank", and Howard Willson, 
"Russia Faces Japan"; dramatic declama- 
tion, Phyllis Damon, "Arena Scene from 
'Quo Vadis'," and Vernon West, "Strong- 
heart"; oratorical declamation, Florence 
Lloyd, "The Constitution", and Howard 
Willson, "We Move Toward Great Decis- 
ions"; humorous declamation, Winifred 
Continued on page 33 



26 



THE TATTLER 




Standing — Manager, Howard Willson, Walter Golash, Stephen Golash, Vardic Golash, 

Coach Thayer 
Sitting — Richard Ames, Henry Howe, Francis Packard, Richard Graves, William Howe 



Boys' Basketball 



With six letter-men returning from last 
year our basketball team had a fairly suc- 
cessful season, winning eight and losing 
seven games. 

We were fortunate in having Carroll 
Thayer, a graduate of M.S.C., as coach. He 
kept the boys hustling and the season 
started well with a victory over Belcher- 
town. 

This year the team won the Franklin 
League plaque taking six straight games 
from Charlemont, Bernardston, and San- 
derson. 

As a climax to the season the team was 
honored by an invitation to play Sander- 
son Academy in a preliminary game at the 
High School Tournament at M.S.C. The 
Burgy boys played one of their best games 
of the season with a score of 34 to 17. 



The 


scores: 






W.H.S. 


25 


Belchertown 


23 


W.H.S. 


20 


Huntington 


30 


W.H.S. 


17 


Smith School 


23 


W.H.S. 


31 


Alumni 


36 


W.H.S. 


16 


Holyoke Voc. 


29 


W.H.S. 


36 


Bernardston 


17 


W.H.S. 


36 


Sanderson 


10 


W.H.S. 


14 


Smith School 


33 


W.H.S. 


38 


Bernardston 


14 


W.H.S. 


41 


Charlemont 


18 


W.H.S. 


18 


Holyoke Voc. 


33 


W.H.S. 


20 


Huntington 


26 


W.H.S. 


21 


Sanderson 


19 


W.H.S. 


32 


Charlemont 


12 


W.H.S. 


26 


Belchertown 


31 


W.H.S. 


34 


Sanderson 
(at M.S.C.) 


17 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



27 




Standing — Manager, Robert Bisbee, George Warner, Henry Howe, Merwin Clark, 
Richard Graves, Richard Watling, Coach Carroll Thayer 

Sitting — Richard Bates, Richard Ames, Vardic Golash, Warren Russell, William Howe, 

William Ryan, Adam Golash, Frank Taylor 
(Francis Packard was lying by third base when picture was taken) 



Baseball 



Under Coach Carroll Thayer, the boys' 
baseball team's success seemed uncertain 
because only four members of last year's 
team were returning. Nevertheless, the 
team worked very well together and sur- 
prised everyone by winning four of the first 
five games. The team slipped a little dur- 
ing the last part of the season and some dis- 
appointing defeats were chalked up against 
it. After the final game, which was a heai't- 
breaking defeat by Sanderson, we found 
that the team had just broken even in the 
ten games played. In spite of this, Burgy 
had beaten Charlemont twice, and its rivals, 
Ashfield, Huntington, and Belchertown, each 



once. The prospects for next year look 
bright as only three of the team will be 
graduated this June. 



The ! 


Scores : 






W.H.S. 


9 


Charlemont 


3 


W.H.S. 


10 


Huntington 


17 


W.H.S. 


24 


Sanderson 


5 


W.H.S. 


7 


Belchertown 


5 


W.H.S. 


9 


Charlemont 


8 


W.H.S. 


6 


Hopkins Acad. 


16 


W.H.S. 


14 


Huntington 


4 


W.H.S. 


10 


Belchertown 


11 


W.H.S. 


4 


Smith Acad. 


11 


W.H.S. 


2 


Sanderson 


4 



28 



THE TATTLER 




Stcmding — Emily Ames, Norma Nietsche, Ruth Black, Catherine Ozzolek, Coach Thayer 
Sittiiig — Bettie Tetro, Marcia Hobbs, Ruth Sylvester, Edna Thayer, Dorothy Harrison 



Girls' Basketball 



In spite of the fact that our basketball 
team did not prove to be a consistent win- 
ner, nevertheless we gave our opponents 
plenty of opposition . We too were fortunate 
in having Carroll Thayer as our coach. 

We won half of our league games, but 
lost to the Alumnae during Christmas vaca- 
tion. The score was close all the way 
through. When the final whistle blew the 
score was, Alumni 21, Williamsburg 19. 

We defeated Powers Institute twice and 
the game at Bernardston was very close. 

The Charlemont six proved too strong for 
us, so we bowed twice to them. 



We broke even with Ashfield defeating 
them at home and losing a hard-fought 
game there. 

Most of the team will return next year 
and a more successful season should follow. 

The results follow: 



W.H.S. 


19 


Alumni 


21 


W.H.S. 


26 


Powers 


24 


W.H.S. 


32 


Sanderson 


21 


W.H.S. 


37 


Powers 


10 


W.H.S. 


26 


Charlemont 


35 


W.H.S. 


14 


Sanderson 


26 


W.H.S. 


14 


Charlemont 


29 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



29 



Jokes 



Mr. Foster (to physiology class) — Name 
the principal parts of a cell. 

Doug.— The "bars". 



Marcia (speaking of Hamlet in English) 
— What do they mean about that dog in the 
second part? 

Miss Walsh — What dog? 

Marcia — Well, they're always talking 
about the Great Dane behind the curtain . . . 



Henry — How did Hooker get a statue put 
up for himself? 

Hack — By Hook 'er by crook, I guess. 



Bernice — What are you going to do after 
graduation ? 

Ruth — I'm going to find a normal school. 
Johnny — I'm going to found a sub-normal 
school. 



Miss Baker in Spoken English — What's 
the matter with your finger, Johnny? 

Johnny — Oh, a bee sat on it and pushed. 



Room I went into hysterics: 
Mr. Foster (stepping into the room) — 
What's going on? 

H. Howe — Willson just sat down. 
Mr. Foster — But why the outburst? 
Hone — There wasn't any chair. 



Miss Walsh (in senior English class) — 
Give me a compound relative pronoun. 
Bernice — John and I sat down in a chair. 



Mr. Foster — What is the largest national 
animal refuge? 

B. Howe— The Elks Club. 



Miss Walsh — Describe the hero. 

Tacky — Well, he was baldheaded and he 
had a funny haircut. 



Junior — My foreign correspondent hasn't 
written for three months. 

Soph. — Oh, did you send him your pic- 
ture? 



Song Hits 



She's Way Up Thar — Tacky meaning 
Roberta 

I Found a Dream — Esther Clark 

No Strings — Physics Class 

The Simple Things In Life— Teachers' Re- 
frain 

Let's Face the Music — The way to the office 

Rhythm is Our Business — Mr. Ball 

Here Am I, But Where Are You — Miss 
Walsh to Junior English Class. 



Shooting High — The archery class 

We Saw the Sea — Hack and Sheila 

Pardon My Southern Accent — Dick Ames 

Lost— Tacky West 

You're the Top— The Glee Club 

Why Must I Be Tormented?— Miss Walsh 
to the Seniors 

You've Got to Be a Football Hero— (or 
rather baseball) to be in love with a 
beautiful girl — Billy and Marcia 



30 



THE TATTLER 



Favorite Sayings 



Mr. Foster: "Graves, Packard and Howe 
—get out". 

Walter Golash: "I don't think we ought 
to do it." 

Cabby Thayer: Now boys, don't you 
want to win this game?" 



John Walshe: "Hey Glom". 

V. Golash: "Curley for Governor". 

Tacky: "Will you pay for the gas?" 

Seniors on the Boston Trip: "Hello, you 
lucky people, here we are". 



We Should Like to See 



John Walshe alone 

Tacky West say good night to that sopho- 
more 

Walter have a few dances with Mary G. 

Pauline teach Carroll archery. 

Betty T. in Easton, Pa. 

Henry travelling to Montclair, X. J. 

Miss Walsh bright and sunny. 



Mr. Foster's Chevrolet do over 25 m.p.h. 

A combination of Packard's and Bisbee's 
sawmills. 

Herbie and Jane fishing. 

Dinny Gould with tonsilitis. 

Esther eat a meal without a cup of tea. 

Sheila without her toast. 



Girls' Glee Club 



President, Florence Lloyd 

Secretary, Esther Clark 

Treasurer, Ruth Barrus 

Accompanist, Phyllis Baker 

The Girls' Glee Club under the direction 
of Rev. Martin L. Ball has added a great 
deal to the school activities, singing at as- 
semblies, concerts, and various school func- 
tions. 

It competed in the Mass. State Music 
Festival at Haverhill in May and received 
the highest rating — 91%. 

The Glee Club broadcasts over the Conn. 
Valley Chain through station WSPR, 



Springfield, every Tue 
P.M. 

Glee Club members: 
Florence Lloyd 
Ruth Barrus 
Esther Clark 
Annetta Barrus 
Phyllis Damon 
Fern Mosher 
Anna Ball 
Winnie Packard 
Edna Thayer 
Barbara Burt 
Phvllis West 



sdav from 4:45-5:15 



Lena Burt 

Lottie Toski 
Marcia Hobbs 
Betty Tetro 
Eleanor Swenson 
Sheila Swenson 
Margaret Lenihan 
Katherine Ozzolek 
Hazel Packard 
Shirley Campbell 
Catherine Emerson 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



31 



The Boston Trip 



The Senior Class with Miss Dunphy as 
chaperone left Williamsburg about 1 P.M. 
on Friday, June 5th, and met Mr. Brooks 
in Brookline. After registering and settling 
down in our attractive hotel rooms, we ate 
dinner and then attended the show at the 
Metropolitan Theater. When the show was 
over, we danced in the Platinum Salon until 
almost midnight. 

Saturday morning we left Boston Harbor 
at 8:30 for a three-hour boat trip with Mr. 
Brooks, aboard the "George A. Hibbard". 
Saturday after noon Mr. Brooks took us out 
to visit the State Prison at Charlestown. 
This was interesting as well as educational. 
After our visit to the State Prison, the boys 
attended a ball game, while a few of the 
girls went shopping and the rest of the class 
went over to the Christian Science Building 
with Miss Dunphy to see the famous Map- 
parium. 

Saturday evening we were divided into 



several groups; some went dancing, others 
attended a show, and others went walking. 
Sunday morning we went with Mr. Brooks 
to the State Reformatory at Concord. Like 
the Prison, this visit too was impressive. 
We then went on to Lexington and Concord 
where we observed all the interesting his- 
torical features, returning to the hotel at 
about two o'clock. After dinner, until six 
o'clock, each one spent the afternoon as he 
wished. 

Then we packed our bags and checked out 
of the Hotel Bellevue. 

I'm sure that all who went on the trip 
enjoyed themselves to the utmost; it was 
an experience long to be remembered! 
Words can't express the wonderful time we 
had, most of it due to Mr. Brooks and Miss 
Dunphy, who did all in their power to make 
our trip a success. We wish to thank them 
for their kindness and cooperation. 

— Florence Lloyd '36 



Alumni Officers 

President, David Hoxie 
Vice-President, Walter Kulash 
Secretary, Thomas Barrus 
Treasurer, Alfred Pomeroy 



Executive Committee 

Anne T. Dunphy 
Estella D. Warner 
Mary T. Walsh 
Phyllis Baker 
Edward C. Foster 



Robert Nash 
Barry Gray 
George Monson 
Mrs. Dorothy Colburn 
Robert Mathers 
Leslie Packard 



Births 



A daughter to Lewis Black '23. 
A son to Lulu Bisbee Smith '15. 
A daughter to Dorothy Jenkins Tiley '21. 
A daughter to Hazel Hathaway Culver 
'27. 

A son to Irene Porter Parker '31. 



Alumni Notes 

Alumni Editor — Alice Dresser 

Marriages 
Virginia Warner '34 to Alphonse LaRochelle 
Lawson Clark '33 to Laurel Fairbanks 
Mary Dunn '33 to Henry Novek 
Elizabeth Parker '32 to Mariano de Piro 
Esther Lupien '32 to William Ambermann 
William Merritt '31 to Esther Reed 
Edith Pearl '29 to Robert Ylitalo 
Winifred Lloyd '29 to Ralph Colson 
Hadley Wheeler '27 to Evelyn Noseworthy 
David Hoxie '25 to Rita Vanasse 
Mildred Dansereau '24 to Edward Ryan 
Donna Emrick '24 to Stanley Gorka 
Charles Watling '24 to Olive Downer 



32 



THE TATTLER 



News of Other Classes 



1935 

Allen Bisbee 

Northampton Commercial College 

Raymond Bradford 

Northampton Commercial College 

Mary Coogan 

Northampton Commercial College 

Helen Demerski At home 

Augusta Emerson Working in Florence 

Rodney Galbraith At home 

Doris Hayden Working in Wales 

Gertrude Heath Working at Beebe's 

will enter Troy Children's Hospital 

in fall 

Arabelle Knox At home 

Dorothy Metz Bryant College, Providence 

Albert Mosher Working at 

Rhoades' Meat Market 

Bessie Muraski Rutland Hospital 

Hans Nietsche At home 

Lena Niewiadomski Working in 

New Hartford, Conn. 

Catherine Paul Rutland Hospital 

Edwin Russell At home 

Vernon Russell Fort Devens 



Evelyn Rustemeyer 

June Tennyson 

Catherine Vining 

Northampton Commercial College 



Smith College 
Springfield 



Henry Waite 

Northampton Commercial College 



Charles Warner 
Otis Webb 
Eleanor Wheeler 



Amherst College 

C.C.C., Chicopee Falls 

Green Mt. Junior 
College, Poultney, Vt. 



1934 

Louise Mosher — Springfield Conservatory of 
Music. 

Nancy Sheehan — Dickinson Hospital Train- 
ing School. 

Elizabeth Webb — Working at Mountain 
Rest, Goshen. 



1933 

George Field — Working at Bosch in Spring- 
field. 

Louise Kellogg — Dickinson Hospital Train- 
ing School. 

Jean Merritt — Working in Groton. 

David Packard — Bigelow-Sanford Carpet 
Co., Amsterdam, N. Y. 

George Rustemeyer — Standard Oil Co., Mt. 
Vernon, N. Y. 

1932 

Philip Cook— Graduated from M.S.C. this 

June. (Engaged to Dorothy Morse). 
Charles Damon — Northampton Electric 

Light Co. 
Ruth Pittsinger — Graduated this year from 

State Teachers College. 
Ruth Pomeroy — Graduated this year from 

State Teachers College. 

1931 

Phyllis Baker — English Department, Wil- 
liamsburg High School. 

Blanche Heath — Secretary to a doctor at 
Veterans' Hospital in Texas. 

Catherine Otis — Teaches in Chesterfield. 
Doris Sanderson — Teaches in Worthington. 
Carroll Thayer— Coach at W. H. S. 
Roger Warner — Graduated from M.S.C. 
Priscilla Webb — Graduated from Dickinson 
Hospital Training School. 

1930 

Nathaniel Hill — Attends Yale Law School. 
Robert Merritt — Insurance Co. Washington, 
D. C. 

1929 

Davis Snow — Editorial staff of Corpus 

Christi Times, Texas. 
Alice Dansereau — Teacher in Haydenville. 

1928 

Richard Merritt — Instructor in Berkshire 
Industrial School, Canaan, N. Y. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



33 



1927 

Robert Tetro — Clerk in Statistical Depart- 
ment, M. S. C. 

1926 

Richard Bissell — Lives in Groton. 
Richard Manwell — Minister in Claremont, 
N. H. 

1924 

Alma Graves — Smith College Infirmary. 

1916 

Ruth Hemenway — On furlough from China. 
Forensic Group 

Continued from Page 25 

Packard, "Ma at the P-T-A" and Ruth Bar- 
rus, "On Being Clinnicked". Townspeople 
generously lodged the guests; the Ladies' 
Benevolent Society served a banquet for 
about one hundred and twenty-five contest- 
ants, judges, and school officials; and the 
Williamsburg Grange served a dinner to 
nearly as many on Sunday. Mrs. E. 
R. Sylvester, church organist, Professor 
George Vieh, pianist and Rev. Martin Ball, 
music supervisor and soloist, each added to 
the audience's enjoyment. The judges were 
professors from Smith College, Amherst 
College, Boston University, distinguished 
educators, lawyers, ministers and coaches 
of speech in non-competing schools. Miss 
Anne T. Dunphy, as Chairman of Hospital- 
ity Committee, made everyone feel at 
home with her gracious cordiality, and Mr. 
Edward Foster's experience at the National 
Tournament in Kent, Ohio the year before 
made his "road map" and his part as chair- 
man of room assignments and registration 
of inestimable help. Miss Phyllis Baker, 
as one of Mrs. Warner's state vice-chair- 
men, presided at the James School and had 
taken an active part in all the organization 
and pioneer work with her. All contestants 
went home with many pleasant memories 
of the "friendly town" of Williamsburg, as 
well as with a zeal to arouse greater in- 
terest in speech training in their respec- 
tive schools. 

Earlier in March, our orators had en- 
tered the 4-Western-Counties Tournament 



in Hadley. Here Winifred Packard and 
Phyllis Damon had placed first and Flor- 
ence Lloyd and Ruth Barrus won second 
honors in this pre-state tourney. 

Later, April 10th, through the co- 
operation of Mr. George Barrus and 
Allen Bisbee, one of W. H. S.'s 1935 en- 
trants in the National Speech Tournament 
— the four senior orators and four debat- 
ers motored to Portland, Maine and entered 
the New England Tournament. Although 
Florence Lloyd was the only one who 
placed there, everyone had a delight- 
ful time and gained many helpful ideas 
about contest debating and oratory. 

Obviously, this speech training took pre- 
cedence over all other extra curricular 
speech work and no other interscholastic 
debates were held. 

The officers of the Debating Society for 
this year were: 
President, Annetta Barrus 
Vice-President, Robert Bisbee 
Secretary, Phyllis Damon 
Executive Committee: 

Henry Howe 

Ruth Barrus 

Wendell Pittsinger 

Pro Merito Society 

Continued from Page 24 

May 9, 1936 we attended another con- 
vention, this time at Agawam High. At 
the business meeting we listened to the list 
of activities of the different Pro Merito So- 
cieties, the reports indicating that Pro Meri- 
to chapters exercise a strong influence for 
good scholarship in their respective schools. 

A tour of inspection of the large high 
school gymnasium was followed by a very 
delicious luncheon served by the ladies of 
the Agawam Congregational Church. 

After Principal F. Earl Williams' cordial 
welcome, Dr. Stryker of American Inter- 
national College spoke. The most interest- 
ing talk of all was given by Rev. Wallace 
Anderson of Faith Congregational Church 
of Springfield, whose speech was entitled 
"Talking to Yourself." 

The afternoon's program closed with an 
interesting one-act play by members of the 
Agawam Dramatic Club, and a social hour 
of dancing. 

At this meeting there were 104 mem- 
bers and 22 faculty members present. 



34 THE TATTLER 



Autographs 



The advertisers have been a great factor in 
making this book possible. All of them 
have met with the stamp of approval from 
either the students, the alumni, or the school 
authorities; so we urge with wholehearted- 
ness that you too patronize these advertisers. 



Do You Know? 

A little meter will tell you if you have sufficient 
light at home and in the classroom for eyesight 
protection? Ask for a free sight meter test at once. 

NORTHAMPTON ELECTRIC LIGHT CO. 



Compliments of 

J. STEWART MOLLLSON 

DAILY EXPRESS 
NORTHAMPTON TO PLAIN FIELD 

Tel. 3402 Williamsburg 



Massasoii Engraving Co. 

Photo Engravers - Artists - Designers 

77 Worthington Street 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



Lsompltmenis oj 



A Friend 



Compliments of 

MacLEOD Tree Care 

Telephone 3451 Williamsburg 

J. W. PARSONS & SON 

TRACTORS AND FARM MACHINERY 

131 Bridge Street Tel. 2885 Northampton 

Compliments of 

James R. Mansfield & Son 

Funeral Service 

HAYDENVILLE 

William Baker & Son 

Qenenai n^lenckand!^ 

Service Courtesy Satisfaction 

CHESTERFIELD, MASS. 



Modem Education 

Our modern school systems put a lot of work upon growing eyes 
which puts a strain upon those with defective vision. Latent defects 
in the eyes of children should be carefully looked after. A little fore- 
sight now may keep them from wearing glasses later and will help 
them in their studies. Let us examine their eyes. 

O. T. DEWHURST 

20 1 Main St. Tel. 184-W Northampton 

JVlcCallum 5 Uepartment otore 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

A big city store in a small city a store built on service 

rendering the same service day in and day out, year in and 

year out an institution devoted to serving an ever growing 

patronage. Alay we be of service to you: 



Let Daniel Ontiit Yon tor Graduation 

Your outfit will be correct but not expensive 
Ask about our special proposition to Graduates 

HARRY DANIEL ASSOCIATES 

Northampton 



Specialized Training For Business Employment 

Business is a practical vocation. It requires certain definite ability of those who 
seek employment — who hope to be chosen from the crowd. Secretarial, Ac- 
counting and Business Administration training are the most effective avenues 
leading to employment and advancement in business. 

Through close association, we are familiar with the requirements of business 
offices. Our graduates are equipped to do the work necessary to secure office 
positions and to win advancement. Complete information on courses will gladly 
be sent on request. 

w. h. McCarthy business college 

45 Gothic Street Northampton Tel. 2186 



Compliments of 



The Haydenvilk House 



JS ewe 1 1 Huneral ±±ome 

R. D. NEWELL 

74 -King Street Northampton 



C. F. JENKINS 

)tationery Crreeting Cards jMeaicin 

Ice Cream 



WILLIAMSBURG 



W. Leroy Chilson 

SIX DISTINCTIVE DEPARTMENTS 
Furniture Upholstering Automobile Plate Glass 

Harness Shop Auto Top and Body Work 

Slip Covers, Cushions Awnings and Canvas Goods 

31 CENTER STREET, NORTHAMPTON 



C. A. SHARPE, INC. 

Maytag Aluminum Washers Champion Range Burners 

Electric Refrigeration 
Hart Oil Burners 

16 Crafts Avenue Northampton 

Compliments of 

WM. J. SHEEHAN & COMPANY 

HAYDENVILLE 

Compliments of 

Chas. A. Bowker 

Hardware and General Merchandise 
TELEPHONE 245 WILLIAMSBURG 

R. E. EDWARDS CO. 

FUNERAL PARLORS 

Lady Assistant 
A service of courtesy, sympathy, and economy 

Tel. Northampton 61-W 
R. E. Edwards, Tel. 61-R N. E. Enwright, Tel. 61-Y 



FRANKLIN KING, JR. 



nstirance 



277 Main Sneer Telephone 610 Northampton 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



R. F. BURKE 



WILLIAMSBURG 



HENRY A. BIDWELL 

Insurance of Every Form 

BIDWELL TRAVEL SERVICE 

Ertrytking Pertaining to Trmztl 

XOXOTUCK SAVINGS BANK BUILDING 

78 Main Street Second floor N:r.:^-.r::- 

Oflke Pbooe 351 Residence, 160 South Street, Phone 348 



ALLISON SPENCE 

100 Main Street, Northampton 



Photographer to Williamsburg High School 
Since 1917 with two exceptions 



THANKS BURGY 



CHARLES A. BISBEE HOMER R. BISBEE 

Tel. Chesterfield 4-2 Tel. Chesterfield 4-3 

Bisbee Brothers 

Dealers in all kinds of Grain, Feed, Fertilizers, Salt, Cement and 

Agricultural Tools 

Bird & Sons Roofing Papers Engines and Separators 

International Harvester Co. McCormick Line Harvesting Machinery 

Building Material Oliver Plows and Cultivators High Grade Grass Seed 

Norfolk Paint 

Get our prices on anything you need before ordering elsewhere 

STOREHOUSES AT WILLIAMSBURG AND CHESTERFIELD 
Telephone Williamsburg 271 Williamsburg, Mass., R. F. D. 1 



^ hen in need of Clothing. Furnishings, 
or Shoes for Men and bors 

TRY 

The Florence Store 

90 Maple St Florence 

Telephone 828-W J. A. Longtin 

Sen ia — Quality- -Satisfaction 



JONES' Glad Gardens 

Bulbs Perennials 

Cut Flowers Floral Designs 



Tel. 4554 



Havdenville 



Compliments of 



JOHN H. GRAHAM 






Coal Oil 



Williamsburg 



Ice 



E.J. O'Donnell Grain Co. 



Poultry & Dairy Feeds 



Cement 



PHOXE 414 



Lime 



Plaster 



FLORENCE. V 



Compliments of 



GRWES GARAGE 



WILLIAMSBURG 



_: — : ~ ~ ~ z- z~ 



A FRIEND 



i \ ortnampton C ommerci C ol/ege 

The School of Thoroughness ' ' 

A ortkampton .Massachusetts 

JCHX C PICKETT P. *pJ 



41st year 



4lst year 






Compliments of 



6. fl. Qu&Qtti 



HAYDENVILLE 



Compliments of 



A inland 



A. Soltys 



MEATS 



GROCERIES 



VEGETABLES 



Telephone 223 



Haydenville 



SOCONY SERVICE 



STATION 



WILLIAMSBURG 



BEEBE'S LUNCH 

A good place to eat Home Crooking 
DINE & DANCE ACCOMMODATIONS 
Berkshire Trail A. L. Beebe, Prop. 

HAYDENVILLE 



Compliments of 



C 0. CARLSON 



GOSHEN 



Compliments of 


Compliments of 


Luce's Garage 


Erwin and Ethel Allen 




Poultry Dealers 



Compliments of 

THE CLARY FARM 

SILAS SNOW 
Try Our Maple Syrup 

Telephone 3563 
WILLIAMSBURG 


DAMON LODGE 

invites 

Transient, yVeeU-ena and 
Permanent buests 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Mrs. C. R. Damon 

43 South Street Ji^illiamsburg 


Compliments of 

FIRST NATIONAL 
STORES 

WILLIAMSBURG 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 


Fred M. Hemenway 

PASTEURIZED 
MILK AND CREAM 

Thones 

Res. 4443 Milk Station 4791 

Williamsburg 


Village Hill Nursery 

ALPINES, PERENNIALS 

and 
ANNUAL PLANTS 

Williamsburg 


Williamsburg Garage 

C. K. HATHAWAY 

Tel. 4351 

Service Station Auto Repairing 

Battery Service 

Ice Cream, Candy, Cigars 

WILLIAMSBURG 


HILLCREST FARM 

Mrs. Clayton Rhoades 

SINGLE COMB 
RHODE ISLAND REDS 

Bred to Win, Lay and Pay 

WILLIAMSBURG 



NOBLE & FLYNN 

REGISTERED 
PHARMACISTS 

ICE CREAM SODAS 

COLLEGE ICES 



YOU may always depend 
upon the quality of {lowers 
which come irom - 



24 Main St. 



IS orthamptan 




FLOWERS 



Knight's Hairdressing 

Frederic's Vita Tonic and Vitron 

Permanent Waving 

Croquignole Self-setting 

Marceling Fingerwaving 

Opp. St. Michael's School 
74 State Street Northampton 



Compliments of 

BELDING'S 

LAUNDRY 



Tel. 392 



Northampton 



For Graduation 

All Types of Cameras 

Cr Supplies 

WINTHROP FOSTER 



165 Main Street 



Northampton 



FLORSHEIM SHOES 



Jt or urlen and W omen 



The DAVID BOOT SHOP 

Northampton 



When yon Think oi 
MUSIC Think oi 

THE MUSIC HOUSE 

O. S. P. Inc. 

Pianos - Music - Records - Instruments 
NORTHAMPTON 



A NATURAL - - 5c 

The 

DRAPER 

Cigar 

The E. & J. Cigar Co. 

Northampton 



A GOOD ASSORTMENT OF 
Trunks Bags 

and Small Leather Goods 

Harlow Luggage Store 



28 Center St. 



Northampton 



Pierce's Paint Store 

Paints Wall Paper Glass 

Painter's Supplies 



196 Main St. Tel. 1207 Northampton 



Athletic Supplies for every Sport 



T. A. Purseglove Co. 



15 State St. 



Northampton 



HILL BRO/. 

Quality Merchandise 

|\enwood Llankefs 

Charters Underwear 

IXnickernick Underwear 



118 Main St. 



Northampton 



Compliments of 



Fleming's Boot Shop 



NORTHAMPTON 



FRANK E. DAVIS 



164 Alain St. 



Northampton 



GRADUATION GIFTS 



vV atches and Jewelry Repairing 



BUYERS OF OLD GOLD 



Compliments of 



DR. J. J. D([\TH\ 



56 Main JV. 



l \ ortnampton 



Hizzitola 

[Viusic Oludio 

"The School of Achievement" 

Banjo, Mandolin, Guitar and 
kindred instruments 

Tel. 2650 

142 Main Street Northampton 



Jt or the young man who gradu- 


Compliments of 


ates this year we have everything 
that he will need for this impor- 


R. A. WARNER 




tant occasioru. 

Merritt Clark & Co. 


FRESH MILK and CREAM 
DELIVERED DAILY 


NORTHAMPTON 


Williamsburg 



COLODNY CLOTHING CO. 

Northampton's Liveliest Store 

Our best wishes to 
the Williamsburg graduates 

Colodny't 

Home of Stein-Block Clothes 
32 Main St. Northampton 



ROSCOE K. NOBLE 

General Insurance 
Real Estate 

Office Phone 2986-W 78 Main St. 

Res. Phone 2986-R Northampton 



Ely Funeral Home 

CHARLES E. ELY 

Lady Assistant 
Tel. 1292-W Northampton 



Compliments of 



TWIN 



CLEANING and DYE WORKS 



North Street 



Northampton 



E. J. GARE & SON 



JEWELERS 



We Buy Old Qold 



112 Main St. 



Northampton 



£ or .Reliable W rist Watches 
ana Jewelry, visit 

DEAR I NG'A 1 

Jewelry Store 



116 M.ain St 



Northampton 



Tke ■Knau.&kcm d\e&& 



205 Main Street - Northampton, Mass. 



PRINTERS 



9IO